The Community of Madrid is celebrating Halloween by turning the former Chamberí metro station into Dracula's Castle

Presenting the event
Aimed at visitors age 12 plus, the event will take place between October 28th and 31st, with an additional special event on November 1st. An interactive micro-theatre play will pay tribute to Bram Stoker's novel, which is celebrating 125 years since its first publication this year. Madrid Metro will give out commemorative card holders to everyone attending the event

The Community of Madrid is celebrating Halloween by turning the former Chamberí metro station, known as the ghost station, into Count Dracula's Castle. From now until the 31st, this underground museum space will hold interactive micro-theatre performances featuring some of the characters from this legendary novel, which is celebrating its 125th anniversary this year. Furthermore, Bram Stoker himself, the novel's author, will join the audience in spirit on a journey of discovery to explore the celebration's Celtic origins in a world which connects the Irish writer to the characters in his novel. In addition, given the success of the initiative, there will be a special event on November 1st, focusing on the legends surrounding the ghost station of Chamberí, which has been frozen in time since 1966.

The initiative, aimed at those age 12 plus, has been organised by Madrid Metro in collaboration with Tourism Ireland and the Irish Embassy in Spain. Madrid's Deputy Minister for Transport and Infrastructure, Carlos Díaz-Pache, as well as Irish Ambassador, Frank Smyth, presented the event today.

Díaz-Pache affirmed "Once again this year, Madrid Metro is joining in the Halloween celebrations, hoping to spark an interest in the history of the underground among both the young and old. Alongside that, the company will offer visitors a spooky experience at Chamberí ghost station, formerly part of Line 1 and one of the first stations to be opened in 1919."

The visits will take place in the form of several sessions lasting approximately 40 minutes. On the 28th there will be sessions running from 16:00 until 23:00. On the 29th, 30th and 31st, the opening hours will be from 10:00 to 14:00 and from 16:00 to 23:00. To be able to attend, Madrid Metro set up a section on the official website www.metromadrid.es where those interested could book tickets free of charge on October 21st.

Due to the great success of the event, as all of the tickets were booked up in a short space of time, Madrid Metro decided to hold a special event on November 1st, from 10:00 until 15:00 and 16:00 until 22:00. It will include a guided tour of Chamberí station, which will still be decorated like Dracula's Castle but without the micro-theatre performances.

For the occasion of celebrating Halloween, Madrid Metro will also give all those attending the event commemorative card holders to store their Public Transport Cards inside. On those dates, they will also be given out in the offices located inside the official underground shops at Sol and Plaza de Castilla stations.

This is not the first time the railway company has celebrated the scariest weekend of the year. In 2019 and 2021, Chamberí was decorated with skeletons, pumpkins and spiders, plus a group of actors had the task of giving any visitors a fright.

A JOURNEY TO THE PAST

Walking down into Chamberí station is like going back to 1950s or 1960s Madrid. It belonged to the first line, which opened in the capital in 1919 (L1) and featured eight stops: Cuatro Caminos, Ríos Rosas, Martínez Campos (Church), Chamberí, Bilbao, Tribunal, Gran Vía and Sol. It is one of the most visited Metro museum areas on the entire network. At the start of the 1960s, Madrid Metro decided to make the trains longer and, as it was impossible to expand this station, it was closed down. The final closure took place on May 22nd 1966.

Its designer, Antonio Palacios, opted for very simple functional solutions in terms of its routes and layout, plus he gave it a simple finish. He incorporated natural light by means of a skylight in the lobby. As for the interior, he chose ceramic tiling with ornamental decoration. The station’s vault is covered in white bevelled tiles and its buttresses were decorated with large squares tiles from Seville, outlining the edges of the ceramic advertising posters in blue and ochre. These advertising posters are one of the station's greatest attractions as they have been preserved, so they look practically the same as when they were first created in the 1920s.

Restored and opened as a museum in 2008, this station is part of the Andén Cero project which encompasses all of the underground museums which aim to immerse visitors in the history of this revolutionary means of transport for the city of Madrid.

Carlos Diaz-Pache, viceconsejero de Transportes e Infraestructuras

Halloween on the underground

The Community of Madrid is celebrating Halloween by turning the former Chamberí metro station into Dracula's Castle
The Community of Madrid is celebrating Halloween by turning the former Chamberí metro station into Dracula's Castle
The Community of Madrid is celebrating Halloween by turning the former Chamberí metro station into Dracula's Castle
The Community of Madrid is celebrating Halloween by turning the former Chamberí metro station into Dracula's Castle