The Community of Madrid receives 2,750 visits in the first week of the exhibition, Antonio Palacios. The Metro Architect

People visiting the exhibition of Antonio Palacios
The Real Casa de Correos is home this retrospective of the artist until 30 June, with free admission for all citizens. More than 200 pieces of graphic and audiovisual material, models and plans about this creator of the underground are displayed over 355 square metres. Three distinct blocks have been established in this space: life and work, stations and electrical substations and the Metro House

The Community of Madrid has received 2,750 visits, 800 of them guided, during the first week of the exhibition, Antonio Palacios. The Metro architect. From 9 May to 30 June, the Real Casa de Correos, the headquarters of the regional government, is home this retrospective of the artist to commemorate the 150th anniversary of his birth.

The exhibition, which is free and open to the public from 10 am to 2 pm and from 4 pm to 8 pm every day, including business days and public holidays, pays tribute to the man who was an essential figure in the history of construction in Spain and the designer of the underground from its beginnings in 1917 until his death in 1945.

More than 200 pieces of large-format graphic and audiovisual material, models and plans are distributed over 355 square metres, giving the people of Madrid an insight into the work that Palacios undertook in the city's subsoil. They detail his role as the creator of the first sections of the underground railway and its industrial buildings such as the Nave de Motores de Pacífico and other facilities in the streets of Castelló and Olid.

Three different blocks have been established in this exhibition space: life and work, stations and electrical substations and the Casa del Metro in order to present this architect and the importance he had in the history of Madrid in the most attractive way.

In order to create the exhibition, it was essential to carry out research work in the underground archives to recover images as well as public and private documents, which in some cases are coming to light for the first time. You can also see unique and singular pieces such as the historic Puerta del Sol 1936, the pavilion of the Gran Vía lift and the first train from 1919 printed in 3D.